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Ka Mo`omeheu o Hawai`i 
Hawaiian Culture

Index to Culture Topics

Ali`i
Aloha
Books
The Island of Hawai`i
`Anaeho`omalu
Bark Cloth
Blessings
Cowboys
Farmers
Feather Work
Food
Gourds
Ho`okupu
Hula
Hulu Manu
Ipu
Kahili
Kapa
Ki`i
Konane
Lei
Lomilomi
Mahi `Ai
Makahiki
Marriage
Nose Flute
Offerings
`Ohe Hano Ihu
Paniolo
Pele
Poli`ahu
Puppets
Ranching
Reading
Tapa
Weaving

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Take the
Six Districts Quiz
and see how well you know the island of Hawai`i!

Recommended Reading about Hawai`i

 

 

 

The Island of Hawai`i
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     A trip around the Island of Hawai`i will take you to many interesting places. Each of the six districts has its own unique character. Learn a little about each of the districts by clicking the above link for more information.
     Here, Leilehua "Auntie Lele" Yuen dances hula for world-renowned Hawaiian slack key artist George Kahumoku.

 

Marriage in Ancient Hawai`i
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     In ancient times, there was no ceremony comparable to the modern wedding. Marriage, as it is known in the Western World today, did not exist. There was no government licensing, no legal requirements, and no divorce - if a couple decided that their relationship was no longer productive, they simply parted ways. As children were reared by the entire extended family, there was little disruption in the life of the youngsters.  

Na Paniola Pipi - The Hawaiian Cowboy
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The Ranching heritage of Hawai`i began with a gift from England and the assistance of Spain. In 1793, British sea captain George Vancouver gifted the Hawaiian King, Pai`ea Kamehameha, with long horned cattle. Kamehameha place a kapu (royal sacred protection) on the cattle, allowing them to roam and breed freely.

   

`Anaeho`omalu
Petroglyphs and History
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     At the north end of the district of Kona, the village, bay, and development area of `Anaeho`omalu (ah-NAH-eh-hoh-oh-MAH-loo) are famed for their petroglyphs, which cover huge portions of the rolling lava fields. Many more petroglyphs are likely hidden under the sands and waves of the shoreline. You can find the petroglyphs by following the well-marked trails near the hotels. It can be very hot here. Go early, before the sun heats the lava. Wear good hiking shoes. Take sunscreen and plenty of water.
     Please stay on the trails, and "malama," protect, our petroglyphs. Even walking barefoot on them, or taking rubbings, gradually wears them away. Go in the morning or evening to photograph them, so that the slanting light gives you the best pictures.
     But this is more than a scenic place. Decisive battles were fought here, which shaped the history of our islands. Click above for more history.